Arv Garrison – The Unknown Arv Garrison Wizard Of The Six String · Classic and Rare Recordings form the 1940s (2021)

Arv Garrison - The Unknown Arv Garrison Wizard Of The Six String · Classic and Rare Recordings form the 1940s (2021)
Artist: Arv Garrison
Album: The Unknown Arv Garrison Wizard Of The Six String · Classic and Rare Recordings form the 1940s
Label: Fresh Sound Records
Year Of Release: 2021
Quality: FLAC (tracks)

Tracklist:
CD 1:
01. Altitude
02. Relax Jack
03. Hopscotch
04. Where You At
05. I Surrender Dear
06. I’ve Got to Go, That’s All
07. Tonsilectomy
08. These Foolish Things
09. Diggin’ Diz
10. Where You At
11. Moose the Mooche (Take 2)
12. Yardbird Suite (Take 1)
13. Yardbird Suite (Take 4)
14. Ornithology (Take 1)
15. Ornithology (Take 3)
16. Ornithology (Take 4)
17. A Night in Tunisia (Take 4)
18. A Night in Tunisia (Take 5)
19. Mop Mop
20. How Deep Is the Ocean
21. It Only Happens Once
22. It Ain’t Gonna Be Like That

CD 2:
01. Where You At?
02. Baby, I’m Gone
03. Fred Shields Introduction
04. How High The Moon
05. Rip Van Winkle
06. Jingle Bells
07. Snake Pit
08. Tight and Gay
09. Sonny Boy
10. Ernest Bubbles Whitman Introduction
11. Medley
12. Dialated Pupils (Take 4)
13. Dialated Pupils (Take 5)
14. Midnight At Minton’s
15. Up In Dodo’s Room (Take 1)
16. Up In Dodo’s Room (Take 2)
17. High Wind In Hollywood
18. Five Guitars In Flight
19. A.B.C. Blues
20. Blues In The Storm
21. Rickey’s Blues
22. Night and Day
23. Stormy Weather
24. Drop Dead

CD 3:
01. Mop Mop
02. Art Ford Introduction
03. Just You, Just Me
04. Lover Man
05. Art Ford Interview, Vivien and Arv
06. The Three Bears
07. Art Ford and Vivien Garry
08. Indiana
09. Art Ford, The Great Experiment
10. Jingle Bells
11. Art Ford and Babs Gonzales
12. Blues in B Flat
13. Art Ford Introduction to Flying Home
14. Flying Home
15. You Can Do It If You Try
16. Spring is Saying Hello
17. Right Me If I’m Wrong
18. New Love
19. Baby, I’m Gone
20. Walk It Off

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Arv Garrison is relatively unknown today. His professional recording career spanned three years after the end of WWII. A majority of that legacy was with the Vivien Garry Trio. The Trio’s first recordings for Guild and Sarco demonstrated Arv’s phenomenal mastery of the electric guitar. He was on several Dial sessions led by Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, and Howard McGhee, but his presence on these recordings is sparse due to the short duration of 78 singles.

Vivien and Arv were on sessions for Signature and Exclusive where they were part of the ensembles backing Leo Watson and Rickey Jordan respectively. Arv plays rhythm backup with occasional solo breaks on these vocalist sessions where his ability to adapt and swing in different musical settings demonstrated his versatility. Arv was hired by Earle Spencer to compose a piece for his orchestra featuring five harmonized guitars. “Five Guitars in Flight” on Black & White 822 remained Arv’s proudest achievement of his recording career.

His most accomplished performances were recorded for the Armed Forces Radio Service on “Jubilee” and “Magic Carpet” transcriptions that were heard by service personnel around the world, but not in the U.S. Likewise, the air checks included in this set were broadcasts on Los Angeles and New York City radio stations but not recorded for commercial release.

Arv Garrison suffered from epilepsy. He was able to perform despite the occasional seizures that his trio mates noticed during their time in California. The seizures became more frequent and pronounced when the Vivien Garry Trio returned to New York.

Arv’s earlier playing had displayed his exceptional gift to communicate commands requiring milliseconds from his brain to his fingers. Epilepsy robbed that facility. Arv’s peers like his close friend, Irving Ashby, continued their performance and recording careers, the essential elements to creating and sustaining an awareness in the minds of jazz fans. His sparse outings on record failed to establish that same recognition. His name disappeared from the jazz polls. Arv Garrison remains mostly unknown among today’s jazz public. — James A. Harrod

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